The Elephant Pump

I’™ve written about the subject of water several times. From the destruction of water mains in Baghdad, to the Latin American fights over public/private control of water supplies (spurred on by IMF/World Bank requirements in developing countries), access to water has and always will be used as an economic (and social control) lever to [...]

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I’™ve written about the subject of water several times. From the destruction of water mains in Baghdad, to the Latin American fights over public/private control of water supplies (spurred on by IMF/World Bank requirements in developing countries), access to water has and always will be used as an economic (and social control) lever to subjugate basic human rights.

But what if – what if – someone came up with an idea that could locally bring clean, uncontaminated water, to the poorest areas of developing nations, at a fraction of the price of Halliburton’™s no-bid contracts?

Someone did. Todd Abrams writes on the story of the elephant pump in Africa in the UnCapitalist Journal. Click on the picture to watch the pump in action!

Due to a shortage of firewood, villagers in a rural area in Zimbabwe werenï–¿–½t boiling the drinking water they collected from an unprotected supply. After two small children and an elderly teacher died from dysentery when a snake fell into their water source and decomposed, an Englishman, Ian Thorpe, working as a teacher at the time, along with other villagers, decided it was time for a change and founded the organization Pump Aid to provide safe drinking water for poor rural communities in Africa’¦

Sometimes the solution to the most complex problem is maddeningly simple. That’™s certainly the case with the elephant pump. There’™s a lot more on Thorpe’™s efforts at Pump Aid’™s website. This is one link that is truly worth the click-through.

Sunday, July 31st, 2005 by Richard Blair |
Category: Uncategorized

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