A victim of his limbic system. How one guy got off.

 

Women’™s groups in Canada are evidently not buying it.

In an unusual case in a Scarborough, Ontario, courtroom, Jan Luedecke was acquitted of sexual assault after a judge ruled he was asleep during the attack “a disorder known as œsexsomnia”.

‘œThis is indeed a rare case’ His conduct was not voluntary,’ said Justice Russell [...]

Commentary By: Gloria

Women’™s groups in Canada are evidently not buying it.

In an unusual case in a Scarborough, Ontario, courtroom, Jan Luedecke was acquitted of sexual assault after a judge ruled he was asleep during the attack ‘” a disorder known as ‘œsexsomnia.’

‘œThis is indeed a rare case “His conduct was not voluntary,’ said Justice Russell Otter, as Luedecke’™s victim shook, sobbed and then left the courtroom”.

Luedecke claimed he fell asleep on the same couch (as his victim) and woke up when he was thrown to the floor.

He only suspected he had had sex after using the bathroom and discovering he was still wearing a condom, court heard. He confessed to police.

Sure enough, the Canadian Psychiatric Association has been looking into this predominantly male phenomenon, which they claim is an extension of parasomnia, events which occur intermittently during sleep. It is duly noted in their conclusion that many of these patients had histories of paraphilia.

This would place sexsomnia in the same group with other NREM parasomnias such as sleepwalking, sleep terrors, and confusional arousals, all of which have partial arousal as a main feature, resulting in an intermixed sleep-”wake state and complex behaviour”

Sexual intent (particularly subconscious) derived from the sexual drive is deeply rooted in the human psyche. This potent force in human behaviour can be recognized in various human activities, and for this reason, we believe that we cannot exclude the possibility of genuine parasomnia that features such under-lyng intent”

From the legal perspective “a sleep walker’s ability to control voluntarily even complex behaviour is severely limited or not available,” and it is considered as a cause of “non-insane automatism.”

Finally, when assessing a sexsomnia case, one should always be aware of possible malingering, the incidence of which may be higher than in other parasomnias.

Wednesday, November 30th, 2005 by Gloria |
Category: General

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