DHS Can’t Meet Port Security Deadlines

It’™s been more than 5-1/2 years since the events of 9/11/2001 forever changed our notions of what national security looks like. For most of us, the false illusion of ‘œsecurity’ that the Bush regime has provided looks more Orwellian than perhaps even George Orwell could have predicted. Certainly, Osama bin-Laden (where is he, [...]

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It’™s been more than 5-1/2 years since the events of 9/11/2001 forever changed our notions of what national security looks like. For most of us, the false illusion of ‘œsecurity’ that the Bush regime has provided looks more Orwellian than perhaps even George Orwell could have predicted. Certainly, Osama bin-Laden (where is he, by the way?) couldn’™t have predicted that he’™d still be operating out of wherever it is he’™s operating in 2007.

The Dubai Ports World fiasco of 2006 opened a lot of people’™s eyes in terms of how real national security issues are treated – in fact, it’™s been said that the DPW purchase of U.S. port operations, fully endorsed by the Bush regime, was a big chink in the breastplate of national security that the GOP has been self-thumping on for the past six years. Today we find that the humongous bureaucracy created in the wake of 9/11, the Department of Homeland Security, is falling down again on the issue of port security:

House lawmakers were skeptical Thursday that the Homeland Security Department will meet key congressional mandates to improve the nation’™s maritime security, especially after one official was unable to name the 10 ports where a new worker identification card system would be tested’¦

‘¦ Fanguy said testing would begin first at the Port of Wilmington in Delaware, but did not specify a date when that testing would begin.

Lawmakers pressed Fanguy to disclose the other ports where testing will be done. To their dissatisfaction, Fanguy could not give an answer.

‘œWhy is it hard to say the 10 that you’™re going to do?’ Rep. Mark Souder, R-Ind., asked in frustration.

Fanguy said the department plans to test the TWIC program at a mix of larger and smaller ports, and is still working with its contractor, Lockheed Martin Corp., to ensure the program does not disrupt port operations’¦

Without getting into the Lockheed Martin contracting angle for a moment (and the company’™s apparent inability to do anything other than bilk taxpayers), let’™s just consider this: by the sixth anniversary of 9/11, there will still not be a worker identification program in place at the weakest link of national security – U.S. ports.

Six long years.

We put a man on the moon in ten.

Monday, April 30th, 2007 by Richard Blair |

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