Reports of Republican Demise Premature?

There’™s two reports this morning that begin the writing of the epitaph for the Republican Party, and they seem awfully credible. First, there is the LA Times report about the fundraising and candidate recruitment problems the Republican Party is having across the nation.

Some of the GOP’™s top choices to run for the House [...]

Commentary By: Steven Reynolds

There’™s two reports this morning that begin the writing of the epitaph for the Republican Party, and they seem awfully credible. First, there is the LA Times report about the fundraising and candidate recruitment problems the Republican Party is having across the nation.

Some of the GOP’™s top choices to run for the House next year have declined, citing what Rep. Thomas M. Davis III (R-Va.) called a ‘œpoisonous’ environment. And Republicans’™ fundraising edge, an important advantage over the last five years, has dwindled.

With GOP clout diminished after November’™s election losses, the Republicans’™ national committee and their House and Senate campaign committees together raised the same amount as the Democrats in the first quarter of the year ‘” and Democrats ended the period with more cash in the bank. At this point four years ago, Republicans had more than twice the money Democrats did.

‘œThe reality is the Republican brand right now is just not a good brand,’ said Tim Hibbitts, an independent Oregon pollster. ‘œFor Republicans, the only way things really get better ‘¦ is if somehow, some way, Iraq turns around.’

Jennifer Duffy of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report said the party was ‘œdesperately in need of some Prozac.’

‘œPoisonous,’ ‘œProzac.’ Those are tough words. Perhaps worse is the notion of just how much the Republican brand has suffered. They’™ve put all their bets down on Bush and Iraq and found the horses to come up lame. And that may be a nice synoipsis of the Republican predicament as described by longtime conservative William F. Buckley, writing in his National Review:

How can the Republican party, headed by a president determined on a war he can’™t see an end to, attract the support of a majority of the voters? General Petraeus, in his Pentagon briefing on April 26, reported persuasively that there has been progress, but cautioned, ‘œI want to be very clear that there is vastly more work to be done across the board and in many areas, and again I note that we are really just getting started with the new effort.’

The general makes it a point to steer away from the political implications of the struggle, but this cannot be done in the wider arena. There are grounds for wondering whether the Republican party will survive this dilemma.

Me, I’™m not buying a thing about the demise of the Republican Party. I go to the movies, and though it has been a long time, I remember Zombie flicks. I remember when the Zombies looked to be toast and then rose from nowhere to attack again. It’™s the 28%ers who play the role of Jason and Freddie. And while it is pleasant to hear news about the Republican Brand being tarnished, or from Bill Buckley that the Republicans can’™t recover, I fear the 28%ers. Zombies can’™t think, and neither can the 28%ers.

Monday, April 30th, 2007 by Richard Blair |

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