Negotiating With “Terrorists” – Again

Here’™s a blast from the past:

‘œNo nation can negotiate with terrorists. For there is no way to make peace with those whose only goal is death.’

- G.W. Bush, 4/4/2002

Of course we negotiate with terrorists. We always have. Negotiation with the opposition (which is a synonym for ‘œterrorists’, both foreign and domestic, in the Bush [...]

/wp/

Here’™s a blast from the past:

‘œNo nation can negotiate with terrorists. For there is no way to make peace with those whose only goal is death.’

- G.W. Bush, 4/4/2002

Of course we negotiate with terrorists. We always have. Negotiation with the opposition (which is a synonym for ‘œterrorists’, both foreign and domestic, in the Bush regime vernacular) is exactly what countries do when they find themselves in untenable diplomatic situations and unwinable wars. The last two major conflicts that the U.S. has been involved in, Vietnam and Korea, were no different.

It should not come as any surprise, then, that the U.S. is sneaking around the back alleys of Iraq trying to find a solution to the quagmire through negotiation with resistance forces, tribal leaders, street vendors, mimes, car bomb mechanics and anyone else who will listen:

U.S. military commanders are talking with Iraqi militants about cease-fires and other arrangements to try to stop the violence, the No. 2 American commander said Thursday.

Lt. Gen. Raymond Odierno said commanders at all levels are being empowered to reach out to militants, tribes, religious leaders and others in the country that has been gripped by violence from a range of fronts including insurgents, sectarian rivals and common criminals.

‘œIt’™s just beginning, so we have a lot of work to do in this,’ he said. ‘œBut we have restructured ourselves ‘¦ to work this issue.’ ‘¦

The last sentence above is interesting – ‘œrestructured ourselves’ – what in the heck does that mean? Removing images of violence by banning photography? Downplaying actual Iraqi casualty figures? Sending Joe Lieberman to a Baghdad market to buy a rug?

Long time readers of ASZ know that I was a barfly at Billmon’™s Whiskey Bar back in the day. During an instance in 2005 when it was revealed that the Bush regime was talking to the insurgency leaders even back then, I think Billmon summed it up most appropriately, and his words have a ring of currency even today:

And so we arrive at the heart of the problem: To salvage any ending short of total defeat in Iraq, the Cheney administration must act like those spineless, flip-flopping liberals. They have to negotiate with the terrorists, listening to their demands, trying to understand their grievances and goals ‘” shit, offering them therapy sessions for all I know. But at the same time, Bush also has to keep up the never-give-an-inch macho act, lest the silent majority finally grasp the dismal truth: Their sons and daughters must go on dying in the quagmire so the neocons can find a way out that doesn’™t involve losing too much face’¦

What the current Democratic majority in congress just doesn’™t seem to be able to understand is that the Bush regime and elected GOP representatives are in the process of branding the Democratic Party as supporters of the regime’™s approach. About the strongest position the Dem leadership has taken to this point in its majority is threatening to send strongly worded letters – to someone.

The neocons way out of losing too much face (as Billmon put it) is to smear the Dems with the same dirty rag that they’™ve been using to cover up the quagmire for the past four years. The bodies continue to fall. The bodies will continue to fall.

‘œNegotiating with terrorists.’ The regime still doesn’™t get it. It’™s impossible to negotiate a way out of a quagmire when the U.S. is the buffer between two warring factions in a civil war, and most importantly, is not considered (by the warring factions) as an honest broker.

The only thing the warring factions in Iraq hate more than each other, is the Bush regime’™s occupation of their country.

Thursday, May 31st, 2007 by Richard Blair |

No Comments

No comments yet.

Leave a comment

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI